These materials are designed to provide small business owners and managers with an awareness of the tools and strategies they should consider to protect their fiscal, physical and human assets in the face of emergencies and disasters. Some industries may be subject to greater regulatory oversight requiring specific safety actions or plans. Additional local regulations may be unique to a community. As you work through this process, be sure that you address these in your overall risk management assessment.

This training was developed in response to Program Announcement No. OSBDC-2009-04, “Supplemental Funding to Small Business Development Centers Assisting Businesses Affected by Natural Disasters in 2008”.

  • These materials are designed to provide small business owners and managers with an awareness of the tools and strategies they should consider to protect their fiscal, physical and human assets in the face of emergencies and disasters.Some industries may be subject to greater regulatory oversight requiring specific safety actions or plans.Additional local regulations may be unique to a community.As you work through this process, be sure that you address these in your overall risk management assessment.

    This training was developed in response to Program Announcement No. OSBDC-2009-04, “Supplemental Funding to Small Business Development Centers Assisting Businesses Affected by Natural Disasters in 2008”.


  • Unless you've experienced a fire, you may not realize how extensive not only the immediate destruction, but also the collateral damage can be. You, your employees and your business can experience hazards not only during a fire but in the aftermath as well. Considering all potential losses related to fires will be important in hazard mitigation. This module addresses key vulnerabilities to consider in developing a specific plan and response for fire hazards.


  • From a minor roof leak to violently destructive hurricanes, any unexpected water intrusion can cause significant damage to both people and property. Flooding can be caused by heavy rains, melting snow, inadequate drainage systems, failed protective devices such as levees and dams, as well as by tropical storms and hurricanes. This module will highlight the unique business continuity considerations for floods.


  • The flu is easily spread from person to person when an infected person coughs or sneezes. This is true for both the pandemic and seasonal strains of influenza. Federal, state and local health agencies all recommend that businesses have continuity plans to help minimize the impact of disruption due to infectious disease. This module describes the hazards associated with flu outbreaks as well as strategies and tactics to address these potential problems.


  • While technology loss might not pose as obvious a personal safety hazard as other emergencies, it is a certainty that your business will experience such a loss at some point that could affect any or all of your key stakeholders. The reestablishment and recovery of regular operations can vary widely depending upon the nature of your business, the nature of the emergency which caused the technology loss and the effectiveness of your emergency plan. This module addresses a key elements of data security and recovery.